Biblical Horizons

The Holy City

Calling Jerusalem the “holy city” comes so naturally to Christians that it comes as something of a surprise to realize how infrequently the phrase is used in Scripture. Not only is Jerusalem rarely called holy, but in the Old Testament this classification is found only in texts that refer to or were written in the […]

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Elijah and Moses

Several months ago, my brief article entitled “Elijah’s Exodus” was published in Biblical Horizons . Since that time, further study has made it evident that Elijah’s exodus in 1 Kings 17 is part of a larger pattern in which Elijah’s ministry closely parallels Moses’. The following parallels are evident: 1. Elijah first appeared bearing a message of […]

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Adele Berlin, Poetics and Interpretation of Biblical Narrative

Adele Berlin, Poetics and Interpretation of Biblical Narrative Sheffield, England: Almond Press, 1983. Reviewed by Peter J. Leithart This volume is the ninth in the “Bible and Literature Series” under the general editorship of David M. Gunn. According to its author, who teaches Hebrew at the University of Maryland, the book is an effort to describe […]

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Second Samuel

Luke’s gospel begins and ends in the temple. It opens with Gabriel’s annunciation to the priest Zacharias (whose name, appropriately, means “Yahweh remembers”) of the coming of a forerunner. Zacharias is performing priestly service at the time. The book ends with the joyful worship of a new priesthood in the same temple. In between, toward […]

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Umberto Cassuto and the Documentary Hypothesis

Several years ago, the Wall Street Journal gave prominent recognition to a book called Who Wrote the Bible? The book was a popularization of the famous “Documentary Hypothesis,” which claims that the Pentateuch was not the work of Moses, but was a (rather incompetent) pastiche of contradictory sources written much later in Israel’s history. This theory labelled the four […]

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Creation Symbolism in the Epistle of James

The epistle of James has long presented dificulties for New Testament scholars. Its seemingly moralistic tone, its apparent inattention to theological concerns, its defense of “justification by works” all have made it dificult for interpreters to discern its compatibility with other New Testament books. Luther’s dismissal of James as an “epistle of straw” was only […]

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